Archives

  • August 14, 2013 Museum on the Go: In The Money on now at the Canada Science and Technology Museum, Ottawa

    By: Louise-Anne Laroche


    Blog-LA-1b
    Summertime: a time to relax and, for most of us, to travel. Years ago, advertisers used to tell us how easy it was to travel: you only needed your bikini, your toothbrush and, naturally, a good travel agency to set you up anywhere in the world. That might still be true for people but for travelling exhibitions the packing process is a bit more involved.
    Content Type(s): Blog
  • July 30, 2013 Remembering Alex Colville (1920-2013)

    By: Raewyn Passmore


    Dollar 1967
    The Staff of the Currency Museum was saddened to learn of the passing of artist Alex Colville who died on 16 July at his home in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. He was 92. One of Canada’s most celebrated painters, Colville is not as well-known as a sculptor but if you look carefully through your pocket change you might just find an example of his work.
    Content Type(s): Blog
  • June 27, 2013 Meet the Currency Museum Team

    Ken
    It’s a big deal to re-invent a museum and it requires a good team. We think we are doing just fine in that regard and would like you to meet them.
    Content Type(s): Blog
  • June 21, 2013 Farewell to the Currency Museum c.1980

    By: Graham Iddon


    Penny Mosaic at entrance / Mosaïque de pièces d'un cent à l'entrée
    The roots of the Currency Museum go back to 1959 when the then Governor of the Bank of Canada, James Coyne, proposed the idea of establishing a currency collection that would reflect the colourful monetary history of Canada. By the time the go-ahead was given in 1963 by Coyne’s successor, Louis Rasminsky, the collection’s mandate had been expanded to include world monetary history, banking and production artifacts and a numismatic library.
    Content Type(s): Blog
  • June 18, 2013 Welcome to the Currency Museum Blog!

    By: Graham Iddon


    We are very excited about this, our museum’s new digital dimension. As the doors close on 2 July for the next three years or so, we are endeavoring to keep them virtually open with a lively flow of reports and updates on the progress of our re-invention.
    Content Type(s): Blog
  • January 1, 2012 Funding the War of 1812

    By: David Bergeron


    This year marks the bicentennial of the outbreak of the War of 1812. The causes of the war extend back to the Napoleonic Wars in Europe, when Great Britain imposed sanctions on neutral vessels, including American ships, crossing the Atlantic and attempting to land in European ports. American frustration climaxed on 18 June 1812, when President James Madison signed a declaration of war against Great Britain.

    Content Type(s): Research
  • July 24, 2009 Broken Coins & Paper Promises

    By: Paul S. Berry


    This paper will review the monetary conditions in 17th-century colonial Newfoundland as revealed primarily through finds from recent excavations at Ferryland.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • November 24, 2008 Ottawa Dairy Tokens

    By: Paul S. Berry


    An Overview of the Dairy Tokens of Ottawa and their Issuers.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • December 1, 2006 La Collection nationale de monnaies et la collection Hart

    By: Annique Maheu


    This paper examines the life of Gerald Hart, his interest in numismatics and collecting, and attempts to piece together the details of the sale of Hart’s collection to the Dominion government in order to positively identify which pieces in the National Currency Collection actually belonged to Hart.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • November 28, 2006 Early Banking in Kingston and the Story of the "Pretended" Bank of Upper Canada (1810-1822)

    By: David Bergeron


    The story of the “pretended” Bank of Upper Canada of Kingston is one scandal and political intrigue. Touted as Upper Canada’s first banking institution, the pretended Bank of Upper Canada was a private, unincorporated financial institution.
    Content Type(s): Research