Research

  • January 1, 2012 Funding the War of 1812

    By: David Bergeron


    This year marks the bicentennial of the outbreak of the War of 1812. The causes of the war extend back to the Napoleonic Wars in Europe, when Great Britain imposed sanctions on neutral vessels, including American ships, crossing the Atlantic and attempting to land in European ports. American frustration climaxed on 18 June 1812, when President James Madison signed a declaration of war against Great Britain.

    Content Type(s): Research
  • July 24, 2009 Broken Coins & Paper Promises

    By: Paul S. Berry


    This paper will review the monetary conditions in 17th-century colonial Newfoundland as revealed primarily through finds from recent excavations at Ferryland.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • November 24, 2008 Ottawa Dairy Tokens

    By: Paul S. Berry


    An Overview of the Dairy Tokens of Ottawa and their Issuers.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • December 1, 2006 La Collection nationale de monnaies et la collection Hart

    By: Annique Maheu


    This paper examines the life of Gerald Hart, his interest in numismatics and collecting, and attempts to piece together the details of the sale of Hart’s collection to the Dominion government in order to positively identify which pieces in the National Currency Collection actually belonged to Hart.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • November 28, 2006 Early Banking in Kingston and the Story of the "Pretended" Bank of Upper Canada (1810-1822)

    By: David Bergeron


    The story of the “pretended” Bank of Upper Canada of Kingston is one scandal and political intrigue. Touted as Upper Canada’s first banking institution, the pretended Bank of Upper Canada was a private, unincorporated financial institution.
    Content Type(s): Research
  • February 3, 2002 Trade and Other Tokens of the Gatineau Region

    By: Paul S. Berry


    A trade token is generally a small metal, plastic or cardboard coin-like item that is redeemable for a product or service by the business that issued it. Bus tickets or subway tokens are the common modern variety. Most were made of aluminum and produced by companies who made marking devices, badges and key tags. In Canada, they were especially popular in isolated communities where cash was hard to come by. An excellent example of this is the popularity of trade tokens that arose in Québec’s Gatineau Valley region from the late 19th century through the early 20th. This article appeared in Up the Gatineau, Volume 28, 2002, a publication of the Gatineau Valley Historical Society.
    Content Type(s): Research