The final testing of the interactives is complete, adjustments made, that panel with the typo has been reprinted and our new travelling exhibition has been disassembled and finally put to bed in its packing crates. It even has bookings.

electronic sign

The exhibition title in both languages rolls past the viewer on a moving electronic sign like one at a stock exchange.

There is always a moment—or a whole lot of moments—when it seems that an exhibition is never going to come together. The text gets changed yet again and needs to be revisited by half a dozen experts; the programmer doesn’t have the latest content for the interactive; we forgot to leave room in the packing crates for the educational programming kit…. Things rarely go as planned and once in a while we get really frustrated and anxious. But travelling exhibition development is always like that and you’d think we’d have learned by now that the exhibition always comes together and nobody dies. OK, the project manager may threaten to kill somebody now and again, but actual death was never going to happen.

children playing a touch panel game

Playing the Mining game. A fast and furious interactive for quick thinkers and quicker hands.

a “subway” map of the financial system

Choose your payment method and follow the money through Canada’s financial system.

boy at a large touch panel

Our historic timeline unit is a colourful and fun to manipulate touch panel.

Over the production period of an exhibition you get far too close to your content. It starts to feel stale—and sometimes you’d rather drink muddy water than read through the copy one more time. But put that content in its new context with clean typography, stylish graphics and compelling interactives and it takes on a new life. For some reason, the copy no longer reads like the owner’s manual of a lawn mower and you listen in amazement as the voice actor makes your video script sound fun and intelligent. The design looks fabulous and you are finally able to step back and see it the way others will see it: a unified mix of media and content with a single goal.

kids sitting in front of a large monitor

A fun knowledge game that will reveal some surprising facts. Play your friends or against the computer.

museum display of coins and bank notes

Artifacts from two centuries of currencies that solved problems in their day but may have been a challenge to accept.

museum panels and a touch screen

Timeline. Following the roots of e-money from the dawn of the internet to modern cryptocurrency.

So what’s Decoding E-money all about? If you aren’t one of our several ardent followers (Hi Mom), a brief description is in order. It’s about the present and the future of money. It’s about money that is moved electronically, money that only exists online and it’s about the history of the currencies and technologies that made it all possible. What actions do you set in motion when you use a debit card or credit card? How does Bitcoin, work? Why does the Bank of Canada take such an interest in e-money? It’s all in Decoding E-Money.

child asleep in front of game unit

Four-year-olds aren’t really our intended audience, anyway.

So now that it’s on the road, you’ll have to look out for Decoding E-money. Check the travelling schedule, our new exhibition could be coming to your local museum or to a town nearby. The RCMP Heritage Centre in Regina, Saskatchewan will be the inaugural host for Decoding E‑Money; on display September through December, 2016. The New Iceland Heritage Museum in Gimli, Manitoba will be taking it from April through June of 2017.